Exhibitions

No-Mad-Ness in No Man’s Land

No-Mad-Ness in No Man’s Land

Exhibition Period
09 Nov 2013 - 22 Dec 2013
Address
ESLITE GALLERY∣5F, No. 11, Songgao Rd., Taipei 11073, Taiwan
Opening Hours
09 Nov 2013

This exhibition examines the nomadism of contemporary migrant artists who deliberately resist location and de-territorialize the origins of their work. It consists of a selection of some of today’s most successful artists based in or originating from various regions in Asia, including the Middle East. These artists are engaged in the acts of moving, living, and working on multiple continents or are addressing such phenomena in their practices consciously, or in some cases unconsciously. They investigate, challenge, and/ or renew traditional nomadic ideals in view of contemporary lifestyles relative to ideas about space, place, people, movement, and nature.  Through their nomadism, these artists elude the fixed identity categories often imposed on them by their country or countries of adoption. 

The word “nomad” comes from the Greek and is defined as “the one who wanders for pasture.” Since the dawn of the modern era, however, or perhaps even since the birth of cities, the term has been used to mean one who moves for various reasons. The paradoxes of a life on the move are playfully highlighted in the exhibition’s double-edged title—to both acknowledge the real challenges of such a lifestyle and also to examine the often fantastic, uncanny images conjured by the term nomad. Namely, one who engages in wild, uninhibited meanderings in unregulated territories at the mercy of highly unexpected and dangerous conditions and circumstances.

From the 1960s onward, significant numbers of artists from all regions of the world—Asia, Africa, South America, and elsewhere—travelled to Europe and North America, and vice-versa. Whether they immigrated for a short period or indefinitely, their art not only contributed to the dynamics of their newly adopted art scenes but transformed art-making processes, theory, and criticism, and ultimately art history altogether. Art historians are therefore now beginning to recognize the starting point of contemporary art by delineating  artists and movements from 1970 forward as “an art that is of the world for the world.”

This exhibition was inspired by the curators’ acknowledgment of this shift as directly connected to the phenomena of artists increasingly moving from place to place and living and working in countries and regions other than their own, especially over the past three decades. Furthermore, the practice of the few brave artists who ventured to isolated places in the world on their own has now become completely institutionalized. Residency programs have sprouted up in museums, universities, and arts organizations in cities, towns, and even villages, large and small, cosmopolitan or remote. A generation of thirty- and forty-something successful artists today will list at least a dozen local and international residencies in their resumes.

No-Mad-Ness in No Man’s Land is the fruit of four years of collaborative research and conversations between curators Leeza Ahmady and Ombretta Agró Andruff, which led to the selection of the ten artists currently in the exhibition. Some of the artists are culturally and historically connected to the notion of nomadism because of their geographical affiliations (Said Atabekov, Yelena Vorobyeva, and Viktor Vorobyev); others because they make the concept of nomadism, displacement, and migration one of the central subjects of their art practice (Mariam Ghani, Sharif Waked, Jeanno Gaussi, Isabel and Alfredo Aquilizan, and to some extent Reena Kallat and Jagannath Panda); and than there are those who may have touched upon this subject more peripherally but with works that make a strong statement in this specific context (Lara Baladi and Khadim Ali).

While the list of artists initially under consideration included individuals and collectives from Italy, Germany, Denmark, Poland, and Mexico, among other countries, the final selection for this specific iteration of the project focused on participants from Asia and the Middle East, including India, Kazakhstan, Egypt, the Philippines, Afghanistan, and Palestine.

The media employed by the artists reflect the wide variety of their practices: from the videos of Mariam Ghani and Sharif Waked to the photography-based works of Said Atabekov, Yelena and Viktor Vorobyev, and Lara Baladi ; the sculptural works and installations by Jagannath Panda, Isabel and Alfredo Aquilizan, Reena Kallat, and the Vorobyevs; and the paintings and works on paper by Jeanno Gaussi, Reena Kallat, Jagannath Panda and Khadim Ali.

No-Mad-Ness in No Man's Land is an open-ended and ongoing project, which the curators envision gaining a nomadic existence in its own right, traveling through different venues in different countries with the possibility of changing the participating artists as it moves from place to place in order to broaden the dialogue concerning various forms of contemporary nomadism. The first manifestation of this project will take place at ESLITE GALLERY, from November 9th – December 22nd.

 

About Artists

Alfredo Juan Aquilizan was born in Ballesteros, Cagayan, Philippines, in 1962, and Isabel Aquilizan y Gaudinez was born in Manila, Philippines, in 1965. They both are currently based in Brisbane, Australia.

The artists’ collaborative works have developed within the spheres of family and community, involving their personal relationships as well as those they share with other artists. For years, they have been exploring the meaning of home and a sense of belonging while travelling extensively for their work. Finding and defining the notion of identity, dealing with the hardships of journey and displacement, sensing presence in absence, and accumulating memory – these are all questions at the core of their artistic practice. They continue to develop these issues through materials and objects both abstract and referential that serve as metaphors for everyday human life. For ten years they collected fragments for an artistic collaboration entitled “Project Be-longing” (1997-2007). They are currently working on a new project, “Another Country,” which deals with migration, dislocation, diaspora, adopting/adapting, settlement/resettlement, and identity.

The artists have participated in a number of international biennales and exhibitions, including the Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2013); Asia Pacific Triennale, Brisbane, Australia (2009); Singapore Biennale, Singapore (2008); Adelaide Biennale, Australia (2008); Biennale of Sydney, Australia (2006); the Third Echigo-Tsumari Triennale, Japan (2006); Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2004); Venice Biennale, Italy (2003); and many others. Their projects in 2013 include: Yes Naturally, The GEM / Photo Museum / Gemeentemuseum, the Hague, Netherlands; FRAGMENTS: A Survey, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; New Work/Old Work, Queensland University of Technology Museum, Brisbane, Australia; In-Flight III, National Heritage Board, Singapore; Moscow Biennale, Russia; and Passing Through: Project Another Country, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan.

Reena Saini Kallat (b. 1973, Delhi, India) lives and works in Mumbai. She graduated from Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai, in 1996, with a BFA in Painting. Her practice spans painting, photography, sculpture, video, and installation, often incorporating multiple mediums into a single work. Over the years she has developed several workshop projects for children, which she was invited to speak about at the World Economic Forum (2012).

She frequently works with officially recorded or registered names of people, objects, and monuments that are lost or have disappeared without a trace, only to be reported as anonymous and forgotten statistics. One of the recurrent motifs in her work is the rubber stamp, used as both an object and an imprint, signifying the apparatus of bureaucracy, which both confirms and obscures identity.

Her work has been widely exhibited across the world in venues such as Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan; Kennedy Center, Washington D.C.; Saatchi Gallery, London, UK; SESC Pompeia and SESC Belenzino in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Helsinki City Art Museum, Helsinki, Finland; National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung, Taiwan; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, Israel; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Arken Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark; ZKM Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney, Australia; Hangar Bicocca, Milan, Italy; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai, China; Busan Museum of Modern Art, Busan, Korea; and Chicago Cultural Centre, Illinois, amongst many others. She was recently the recipient of the ZegnArt Public Award, Milan, Italy (2012) for which she was commissioned to realize a large sculptural installation for the facade of the Dr. Bhaudaji Lad Museum, Mumbai, India.

Sharif WAKED

Sharif Waked was born in 1964 in Nazareth, Israel, to a Palestinian refugee familyfrom the village of al-Mujaydil.His videos, installations, and paintings explore contemporary politics and history. He re ects on propaganda strategies and globalized images of conflict and reminds viewers of the rich heritage of Islamic literature and art. His works re-enact iconic political events, some of which recently occurred in the Arab world, while at the same time investigating themes such as representations of moments of collapse, ghosts, hybridity, repetition, and transitions between languages. He currently lives and works in Haifa and Nazareth.

Waked has exhibited at various museums, biennials, and art venues including: Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2003, 2009);Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, UK (2004); The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel (2008); Tate Modern, London, UK (2008); Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris, France (2009); Queens Museum of Art, New York (2009); Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia (2010); Royal Academy of Arts, London, UK (2010); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2011); Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan (2012).

Waked’s works can also be found in various private and public collections including: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE; Fondation Louis Vuitton Pour la Création, Paris, France; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel; Queensland Art Gallery, South Brisbane, Australia; Barjeel Art Foundation, Sharjah, UAE; and the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

Yelena & Viktor VOROBYEV

Yelena Vorobyev was born in 1959 in Nebit-Dag, Turkmenistan, and Victor Vorobyev was born in 1959 in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan. The Vorobyevs began working together on conceptual art projects as a married couple in the early 1990s, exploring different mediums such as sculpture, painting, photography, installation, and performance. They playfully use humor, reactions, language, philosophy, psychology, and materiality to create multi-layered works that comment both on the simplicity and complexity of life in Central Asia. They currently live in Almaty, Kazakhstan, where they work as artists, writers, and curators. 

Many of their early collaborations criticized trivializing views of what constituted "fine" art and how to
preserve it. By using found materials from nature and other sources, the Vorobyevs stressed the "neness" of mundane objects in works which were accompanied by a series of street performances / actions, entitled "Classic Bidding Farewells to People." In 1999, they were invited to bring this project to the Istanbul Biennial, becoming the  rst artists from Kazakhstan to appear on the international art scene. They have been widely exhibited in Central Asia, Russia, and Europe. Being among the forefront of a generation of artists, they are affectionately remembered for their statement,“ It is still unclear whether it is humanity that consumes the product or the product that consumes humanity,” is quoted with affection by a generation of artists. 

A selection of major exhibitions include: Art from Central Asia: Contemporary Archive, Central Asia Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Italy (2005); Zones Of Contact, 15th Biennale of Sydney, Australia (2006); Time of the Storytellers, Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, Finland (2007); Progressive Nostalgia. Contemporary Art from the Former USSR. Centro per l'Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato, Italy (2007); + 007, National Centre for Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia (2008); Tracing Roads Through Central Asia, Yerba Buena Center for Art, San Francisco (2008); Unrealized Projects, Stuttgarter Kunstverein, Stuttgart,
Germany (2008); Making Interstices, Central Asia Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Italy (2009); Tarjama/Translation, Queens
Museum of Art, New York, (2009). 

 

Jagannath PANDA

Jagannath Panda was born in 1970 in the city of Bhubaneswar, in the state of Odisha in eastern India. He received a B.F.A. in 1991 from the B.K. College of Art & Crafts in Bhubaneswar, an M.F.A. in 1994 from the M.S. University in Baroda, and went on to receive a second M.F.A. in 2002 from the Royal College of Art in London. In 1997, he was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Fukuoka University in Japan. He currently lives with his wife and son in Gurgaon, a suburb of New Delhi.

Panda's work is characterized by a collage technique in which the surface of the canvas or sculpture is built up with layers of brocade fabrics blended together to create the skins of beasts and feathers of birds, to mimic foliage, or to approximate man-made surfaces. This hybridized surface treatment corresponds with many of the artist's themes, which focus on moments, locations, and icons that are in a state of  ux, caught between oppositions that can only be reconciled with anxiety and confusion. Panda’s portraits of the burgeoning new city of Gurgaon (where he lives and works) illustrate the tensions to be found there, as over-development threatens natural habitats, and infrastructures prove to be inadequate even before they are completed.Likewise, Panda's mix of the mythological and the realistic points to the disoriented nature of Indian identity today, in its desire to synthesize the traditional and the contemporary, the indigenous and the international, the imaginary and the actual.

He has been included in many group shows at international institutions, including: The Sight of Asia, the Asian Art Museum, Fukuoka, Japan (1997); Where in the World, Devi Art Foundation, New Delhi, India (2008); Chalo! India, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan (2009) and Essl Museum, Vienna, Austria (2009); Transformation, Museum of Contemporary Art of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (2010); Indian Highway V, MAXXI Museum, Rome, Italy (2011); Phantoms of Asia, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, USA (2012); and Indian Highway VI, Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, China (2012).

Reena SAINI KALLAT

R eena Saini Kallat (b.1973, Delhi, India) lives and works in Mumbai. She graduated from Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai, in 1996, with a B.F.A. in Painting. Her practice spans painting, photography, sculpture, video, and installation, often incorporating multiple mediums into a single work. Over the years she has developed several workshop projects for children, which she was invited to speak about at the World Economic Forum (2012).

She frequently works with of cially recorded or registered names of people, objects, and monuments that are lost or have disappeared without a trace, only to be reported as anonymous and forgotten statistics. One of the recurrent motifs in her work is the rubber stamp, used as both an object and an imprint, signifying the apparatus of bureaucracy, which both con rms and obscures identity.

Her work has been widely exhibited across the world in venues such as Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan; Kennedy Center, Washington D.C.; Saatchi Gallery, London, UK; SESC Pompeia and SESC Belenzino in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Helsinki City Art Museum, Helsinki, Finland; National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung, Taiwan; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, Israel; National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea; Arken Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark; ZKM Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany; Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney, Australia; Hangar Bicocca, Milan, Italy; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai, China; Busan Museum of Modern Art, Busan, Korea; and Chicago Cultural Centre, Illinois, amongst many others. She was recently the recipient of the ZegnArt Public Award, Milan, Italy (2012) for which she was commissioned to realize a large sculptural installation for the facade of the Dr. Bhaudaji Lad Museum, Mumbai, India.

Mariam GHANI

Mariam Ghani is an artist, writer, and teacher based in Brooklyn, New York. She has a B.A. in Comparative Literature from New York University and an M.F.A. in Photography, Video, and Related Media from the School of Visual Arts.

Ghani's research-based work explores how histories, places, identities, and communities are constructed and reconstructed and how shifting private and public narratives comprise and contest those constructions. She is particularly fascinated by border zones, no man’s lands, translations, transitions, and the areas where cultures intersect and nature and arti ce imitate and in uence each other.

Her exhibitions and screenings include Rotterdam Transmediale Film Festival, The Netherlands; CPH:DOX Film Festival, Copenhagen, Denmark; dOCUMENTA [13] in Kabul, Afghanistan and Kassel, Germany (2012); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011); the National Gallery, Washington, D.C., USA (2008); and the Sharjah Biennial 9 and 10, UAE (2010, 2011). Recent texts have been published by Creative Time Reports, Filmmaker, Mousse, the Radical History Review, Triple Canopy, and the New York Review of Books blog. Ghani has collaborated with artist Chitra Ganesh since 2004 as the experimental archive Index of the Disappeared; with choreographer Erin Kelly since 2006 on the video series Performed Places; and with media archive collective pad. ma since 2012 on the digitization and dissemination of the Afghan Films archive. She has been awarded the NYFA,
Soros and Freund Fellowships, grants from the Graham Foundation, CEC ArtsLink, the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation and the Experimental Television Center, and residencies at LMCC, Eyebeam Atelier, Smack Mellon, and the Akademie Schloss Solitude. She currently teaches in the MFA program at Pratt Institute and is an artist in residence at the Asian/Paci c/American Institute at New York University.

 

Jeanno GAUSSI

Jeanno Gaussi, born in Kabul, Afghanistan, is a Berlin-based mixed-media artist who began her career working in  lm and video. One of her early videos, Three Notes, won  rst prize at the 54th International Short Film Festival in Oberhausen, Germany; was listed as one of the Best 100 German Short Films; and was nominated for the national Best German Short Film award. In 2007, Gaussi was selected for the Berlinale Talent Campus, and she then extended her practice to include photography and installation art.

Gaussi's work explores cultural identities and aspects of memorization and remembrance. She often develops site-responsive projects that have a symbiotic relationship with the places in which they are created and through which she examines the characteristics and unique aspects of her surroundings., As an artist who grew up in Kabul, Delhi, and Berlin, Gaussi’s multi-cultural background has greatly in uenced her artistic practice, but her interests and work transcend national borders and categorizations. 

Gaussi has participated in residencies in Pakistan (International Diasporic Artists Residency, Karachi); Jordan (International Artist Workshop, Shatana); Turkey; and Palestine (Al-Mamal Art Residency, Jerusalem), among others. She has received art grants from the Triangle Arts Fund, the Defa Film Fund, and the Goethe-Institut. In 2010, she participated in the Jerusalem Show IV, curated by Jack Persekian, and was invited by ArteEast to present her work at the Sharjah March Meetings, UAE.
Her short films have been screened internationally at festivals, including Kara Film Festival, Pakistan; the International Film Festival, Oberhausen, Germany; and Clermont-Ferrand Festival, France. Gaussi is a member of the Afghan Contemporary Art Research team, which documents the contemporary art scene in Afghanistan. In 2012, she was invited to be one of the speakers at TEDx (Marrakesh, Morocco), and a participating artist featured at dOCUMENTA [13] in Kabul, Afghanistan and Kassel, Germany.

 

Lara BALADI

Egyptian-Lebanese artist Lara Baladi was born in Beirut, raised in Cairo and Paris, and educated in London. She has lived in Egypt since 1997. Whether ephemeral or permanent, her work interweaves and bridges the private and public, personal experiences and reflections on the socio-political conditions of the worlds she lives in. Drawing from the shifting borders of her identity, the artist develops her work while building an archive made of photographs, images, Youtube videos, articles and objects. Throughout her work, she interprets and re-interprets her archive:“ a broken memory which I try to  x” she says. She superimposes and intertwines layers of meaning, selecting iconographies that reference traditional and contemporary myths, playing with archetypes, which by de nition are cross-cultural and a-temporal, guiding the viewer and sometimes intentionally losing the viewer in a multitude of potential narratives.

Her work encompasses photography, video, collages and digital montages, installations, architectural constructions, tapestries, sculptures and perfume. In 2003, she received a Japan Foundation Fellowship to research manga and anime in Tokyo. In 2006, she organized and curated the artist residency Fenenin el Rehal (Nomadic Artists) in the Libyan Desert. Her work, Borg el Amal (Tower of Hope), an ephemeral construction and sound installation, won the Grand Nile Award at the 2008/2009 Cairo Biennale. She collaborated with the Kiev Kamera Orchestra to perform the Donkey Symphony, Borg el Amal's sound component, at the first Kiev Biennial in 2012. During the 2011 Egyptian uprising, Baladi co-founded two media initiatives:
Radio Tahrir and Tahrir Cinema. Both projects were inspired and informed by the eighteen days that toppled Mubarak's leadership. Tahrir Cinema served as a public platform to build and share a video archive on and for the revolution. Baladi is a member of the Arab Image Foundation since its creation in 1997.

 

Said ATABEKOV

K 沙伊德.阿塔貝可 azak artist Said Atabekov was born in 1965 in a Bes Terek village in Uzbekistan. One of the most important artists in Central Asia, he began his artistic activity in 1993 as a member of the Red Tractor Group, the  rst avant-garde art collective founded in southern Kazakhstan after the Perestroika.A witness to successive waves of social and political change in an area which is a battleground for at least four strong ideologies – nomadic pantheism, Islam, Communism, and Western capitalism – Atabekov explores the intersections and local impact of often con icting cultures, skillfully identifying and animating elements that reveal their deeper paradoxes.

Like many of today's artists, Atabekov's work spans a variety of media, from video and photography to sculptures and installations. Hislinguistic mix of ethnographic signs is heavily in uenced by recollections of the Russian avant-garde and post-Soviet global interventions, along with an intimate and often touching analysis of his condition as a contemporary artist. His practice, though deeply rooted in a particular culture and geography, is yet very much part of the global art community at large. While acutely aware of the attractiveness of the exoticism associated with the iconographical stereotypes of Central Asian art, he often refers to them ironically, mixing them with elements of shamanic, nomadic, or Su creativity in his projects. 

Atabekovhas participated in several international exhibi t ions and biennales, including:  Prague Quadriennale, Czech Republic (2003); Istanbul Biennial, Turkey (2005);Media Art Biennale, Free Waves, Los Angeles, California (2006);La Biennale de Montreal, Canada (2007), Photoquai Biennale, Paris, France (2009) ;  4.Fotofestival Mannheim, Ludwigshafen Heidelberg, Germany (2011);Ostalgia, New Museum, New York, (2011);Central Asia Pavillion at the Venice Biennale, Italy (2005, 2007, and 2011);Migrasophia,Maraya Art Center, Sharjah, UAE (2012).

 

Isabel & Alfredo AQUILIZAN

A lfredo Juan Aquilizan was born in Ballesteros, Cagayan, Philippines, in 1962, and Isabel Aquilizan y Gaudinez was born in Manila, Philippines, in 1965. They both are currently based in Brisbane, Australia.

The artists' collaborative works have developed within the spheres of family and community, involving their personal relationships as well as those they share with other artists. For years, they have been exploring the meaning of home and a sense of belonging while travelling extensively for their work. Finding and de ning the notion of identity, dealing with the hardships of journey and displacement, sensing presence in absence, and accumulating memory – these are all questions at the core of their artistic practice. They continue to develop these issues through materials and objects both abstract and referential that serve as metaphors for everyday human life. For ten years they collected fragments for an artistic collaboration entitled "Project Be-longing" (1997-2007). They are currently working on a new project,"Another Country", which deals with migration, dislocation, diaspora, adopting/adapting, settlement/resettlement, and identity.

The artists have participated in a number of international biennales and exhibitions, including the Sharjah Biennial, UAE (2013); Asia Pacifi c Triennale, Brisbane, Australia (2009); Singapore Biennale, Singapore (2008); Adelaide Biennale, Australia (2008); Biennale of Sydney, Australia (2006); the Third Echigo-Tsumari Triennale, Japan (2006); Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2004); Venice Biennale, Italy (2003); and many others. Their projects in 2013 include: Yes Naturally, The GEM / Photo Museum / Gemeentemuseum, the Hague, Netherlands; FRAGMENTS: A Survey, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; New Work/Old Work, Queensland University of Technology Museum, Brisbane, Australia; In-Flight III, National Heritage Board, Singapore; Moscow Biennale, Russia; and Passing Through: Project Another Country, 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan.

 

Khadim ALI

Khadim Ali was born in 1978 as an Afghan refugee in Quetta, Pakistan. His family, belonging to the Hazara minority,  ed Afghanistan to escape Taliban persecution. After studying mural painting and calligraphy in Tehran, Iran, from 1998 to 1999, he went on to earn his B.F.A. at the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan, in 2003, where he studied traditional miniature painting. He currently lives and works in Sydney, Australia, Quetta, Pakistan, and Kabul, Afghanistan.

Through his work, Ali connects himself both aesthetically and conceptually to a span of nearly ten centuries of Afghan history. Choosing his subject matter from the country’s pantheons of heroes and legends, both secular and religious, Ali often re-appropriates them to communicate his own personal history. Eclectically rich in traditional and modern motifs as well as in Eastern and Western art-historical references, Ali's paintings tell stories about loss, in particular the loss of his own cultural heritage and in general the loss of human values. Through his work, he explores how meaning shifts and words are perverted through ideological adoption.

Ali's works were featured along with Imran Qureshi’s in the Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan Pavilion at the 2009 Venice Biennale, Italy. He both organized and participated in The Haunted Lotus: Contemporary Art from Kabul, Cross Art Projects, Sydney, Australia (2010) and The Force of Forgetting, Lismore Regional Gallery, Lismore, Australia (2011). His work was also included in Future: Afghanistan, Gemak, The Hague, Netherlands (2008); Living Traditions, Queen’s Palace, Kabul, Afghanistan (2008) and National Art Gallery, Islamabad, Pakistan (2009); Safavids Revisited, British Museum, London, UK (2009); Only
from the Heart Can You Touch the Sky, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Australia (2012); and Home Again — 10 Artists Who Have Experienced Japan, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan (2012). Ali presented  ve paintings at dOCUMENTA [13], Kassel, Germany (2012), alongside another painting at the dOCUMENTA [13] Kabul, Afghanistan, exhibition, the first off-site exhibition held in dOCUMENTA's history (June, 2012). Three works from Ali's Rostam series were also acquired by and exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum, New York (2013) as part of the exhibit, No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia.

 

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