Exhibitions

LU Liang

LU Liang

Exhibition Period
05 Apr 2014 - 11 May 2014
Address
ESLITE GALLERY∣5F, No 11, Songgao Road, Taipei, Taiwan
Opening Hours
05 Apr 2014

LU Liang’s paintings have very strong narrative quality and at the same time implicate powerful emotions beneath their quiet appearances, reflecting the complex and agitating ambience of the contemporary world.

Human’s state of survival in this fast-pace society has always been the pivot of LU’s work. Through exquisite rendering of the light and setting, he creates scenes which look realistic while are emotionally indescribable to bring out his queries about the contemporary life in China and beyond. In many of LU’s landscapes or interiors such as Three Fifteen, Grey Island, and the “Night Road” and “Underground Office” series, people are absent from the depicted scenes. However, traces of human activities can be sensed clearly in these spaces that hint at some unspoken stories.  

The “Zhuangzi” series that LU started during his graduated school years was inspired by his reading of the Chinese classical literature Zhuangzi. The dramatic setting and lighting in this series remind us of the paintings from the Baroque while motifs from the Song Dynasty ink painting can also be found. All these references to classic materials of both the East and the West have been blended into fables about people’s life nowadays. LU once said: “I wish to use the classics with a contemporary attitude rather than invariably worship or simply imitate them. For me, the continuation of classics is a mode of appreciating the world, a mode that might seem clumsy but is undoubtedly reliable.”

LU Liang was born in 1975 in Shanghai, China. He went to Beijing to pursue his artistic training in the Department of Murals in The Central Academy of Fine Arts, and graduated with B.A. and M.A. degrees in 1999 and 2005 respectively. LU is currently a lecturer at The Central Academy of Fine Arts.

LU Liang

LU Liang's paintings have very strong narrative quality and at the same time implicate powerful emotions beneath their quiet appearances, which reflecting the complicate and agitating ambience of the contemporary world.

Human's state of survival in this fast pace society has always been the pivot of LU's work. In his work, references to classic materials of both the East and the West have been blended into fables about people's life nowadays. LU once said, "I wish to use the classics with a contemporary attitude rather than invariably worship or simply imitate them. For me, the continuation of classics is a mode of appreciating the world, a mode that might seem clumsy but is undoubtedly reliable." Through exquisite rendering of the light and setting, he created scenes which look realistic while emotionally indescribable to bring out his queries about the contemporary life in China and beyond. In many of LU's landscapes or interiors, the scenes are empty.  However, traces of human activities can be sensed clearly in these spaces that hint at some unspoken stories. 

LU Liang was born in 1975 in Shanghai, China. He went to Beijing to pursue his artistic training in the Department of Murals in The Central Academy of Fine Arts, and graduated with B.A. and M.A. degrees in 1999 and 2005 respectively. LU is currently a lecturer at The Central Academy of Fine Arts.

1975        Born in Shanghai, China
1999        B.A., Department of Murals, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China
2005        M.A., Department of Murals, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China
Present    Teaching at the Central Academy of Fine Arts

 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS
2017        "State of Memory", ESLITE GALLERY, Taipei, Taiwan

2014        "LU Liang Solo Exhibition", ESLITE GALLERY, Taipei, Taiwan

2007        "Night Wanderer", CREEK  ART, Beijing, China
2003        "Fabricated Space", Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China
1998        "All About Xiao Jing’s Living", Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China
 
GROUP EXHIBITIONS
2014        "Choice: Central Academy of Fine Arts Annual Fine Arts Nomination Exhibition",

               CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China
2013        "From Beijing", New York Academy of Art, New York, USA
               "Academy: Exhibition of Works of 10 Young Teachers from Central Academy of

               Fine Arts", Today Art Museum, Beijing, China
               "Teachers' Work of Central Academy of Fine Arts 2013", CAFA Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
2012        "IN TIME: 2012 Chinese Oil Painting Biennale", National Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
               "Art  Classics: China National Academy of Painting Exhibition", Sunshine

               Art Museum, Beijing, China
               "Not Only Paper", CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China
2011        "Foundation.10 years", CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China
               "Academy: Exhibition of Works of 8 Young Teachers from Central Academy of

               Fine Arts", Baiyaxuan  798, Beijing, China
               "The 4th  National Fine Arts Exhibition for Young Artists", National Art

               Museum, Beijing, China
2010        "Works by Teachers at the Central Academy of Fine Arts", CAFA Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
               "Oil Painting and Contemporary Society: Chinese Oil Painting Exhibition",

               National Art Museum, Beijing, China
2009        "60 Years of Drawing: Central Academy of Fine Arts", CAFA Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
2008        "3rd Beijing International Art Biennale", National Art Museum, Beijing, China
               "Future Sky: Chinese Contemporary Young Artists Works Selection Exhibition",

               Today Art Museum, Beijing, China
               "National Exhibition on Painting from Nature", National Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
               "Convergent Paths: a Joint Exhibition by China Central Academy of Fine Arts

               Professors", Chan-Liu Art Museum, Taipei, Taiwan
2007        "Fusion and Creation",  Capital Museum, Beijing, China
               "The 1st Painting from Natural Biennial", Art Museum of Guangzhou Academy of

               Fine Arts, Guangzhou, China
               "Academy Exhibition Series - Central Academy of Fine Arts", C5Art Centre,

               Beijing, China
2006        "Grand Exhibition of Contemporary Chinese Art", National Art Museum,

               Beijing, China
2005        "The Displacement of Face", Aurora Gallery, Beijing, China
               "Excellent Award of the Central Academy of Fine Arts Graduation Exhibition",

               The exhibition hall of China Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China
2004        "Shanghai Youth Art Exhibition", Liu Haisu Art Museum, Shanghai, China
               "The 10th National Art Exhibition", Guangzhou Art Museum, Guangzhou, China


AWARDS 
2005         Excellent Award of the Central Academy of Fine Arts Graduation Exhibition
                First Prize of Wang Jialian Oil Painting Scholarship
1999         First Prize of the Central Academy of Fine Arts Graduation Exhibition
 

Landmarks: The Neglected Corners of Everyday Life Illuminated by Lu Liang

By Song Xiaoxia, Professor of The Central Academy of
DOWNLOAD

 

A dense cloud of smog hangs over the city of Beijing without being dissipated for days on end, obscuring all the ancient and modern landmarks of the metropolis; the Ten Great Buildings in the walled inner city, the CCTV building on East Third Ring Road and the Pangu Plaza on North Fourth Ring Road are all secreted by the smoke. A wisecrack on the internet says that this is so because Beijing had become the mythical, fog-encircled land of the saints and immortals. But the reports and analyses of PM2.5 particles on the news evoke a sense of unease, anxiety and helplessness; we feel deprived of air, as if we fear to breath. This omnipresent and inexplicable stimulus induces a hopelessness that is beyond escape. In the smog, there is people, a city and many breathings; there is also sudden death, accompanied by a relentless spiritual apprehension that finally leads to despair. Lu Liang’s artwork situates this spiritual apprehension he calls “the mien of contemporary Chinese society” in the most commonplace of scenes.

Ruins in the night; a pile of broken-up bricks; a burning garbage heap; an abandoned movie theater; a coal storage with no stores left; a quarantined sickroom; a gloomy tunnel; a line of willow trees by the side of the road at night; a rain-flooded underground passage from which rain water had just been drained; a blank steel billboard under the twilight — Lu Liang’s paintings feature the gradual erasure of people as well as the narrative in their imagery. What remains on canvas are the scenes themselves, benighted and dismal, such as a concrete floor illuminated by electric lights; a patch of dirt and tire tracks in the mud, and they forcefully take hold of us. Lu Liang said, “Abruptly extricate objects from everyday life, severe them from their environs and give them a beam of light — at that instant they acquire meaning.” Lu Liang’s paintings shed light to the microscopic fissures of our perception, which conceals the experience of everyday life, suddenly exposing them to the light of day.

Lu Liang’s relationship with objective reality is predominantly emotive. When Lu painted willow trees, he waited two years for the perfect moment to capture willow leaves covered in dust. That moment allowed Lu’s art to break through the murkiness of objective reality, the opacity of memory, and layers upon layers of historical and cultural heritage. The odor of rubbish heap that lingered in his studio, and that of fiberglass from the sculpture studio next doors, also comes through to the viewer. In modern life that is rife with rapid change, Lu Liang deliberately opens up his sensibilities to this world without hurry. He reads, he pays rapt attention to the issues, but he does not allow intellectual concepts or concerns to dictate what he paints. Rather than the product of reasoned analysis, Lu Liang’s works are the direct output of his lived experience; they come from his incisive and deeply felt emotions. The dusty corners of everyday life that he excavates through his paintings have the power to tend our own times to the quick.

Lu Liang prefers the rich colors of deep night. What does he see in the dim, murky lights of the night in his wanderings? An “invisible hand” seems to haunt the darkness. Just what is broken in Brick Pile? And what is incinerated by Burning? Coal Storage is a milestone of a masterpiece among Lu Liang’s works. Emblematic of Lu Liang’s ability to express utter dread with utter calm, every inch of the canvas exudes a disquiet that is more horrifying than any intellectual discourse on energy supplies, human survival or environmental preservation. If Nanhu Cinema is the last, loving backward glance to the society that we left behind, Night RoadSafety Passageway is a horrific look at our society in the present. On Night RoadWillow, the artist remarks: “It was a forlorn road in an oppressive night, at the end of which there is only suffocating darkness. It was nightmarishly alone and crawling with danger.” The dark atmosphere in those scenes of the night is but the emissions of our own lived reality. For Lu Liang, the true picture of our times is best captured not by depicting its people, but by painting its nightscapes.

From a worldwide perspective, Lu Liang’s current artworks are excellent. He has his own opinions and character, as well as unique substance and a distinct style. Lu’s ambition to create “a portrait of the times” is shared by many contemporary Chinese artists. What is unique to Lu Liang is the realization of that ambition on canvas, its concrete visual expression. We do not need to go into lengthy discussion of the long history of European classical oil painting that sought to translate the artist’s apprehension of the world and perception of “reality” with oils on canvas, nor do we need to narrate the numerous shifts and changes that took place in Chinese art since the adoption of the realistic oil painting over a hundred years ago. There are fall traps enough in the artistic and stylistic conflict between the ancient and the modern, the oriental and occidental, and the siren song of the marketplace. Lu Liang does it the hard way; in his words I have heard years ago, “Happiness is to find an image that one can work real effort into its painting.”

Contemporary art is inclined away from visualization, but Lu Liang goes against the grain. He wants to “work real effort” into the images, to repeatedly use “torturous” strokes to reveal and express the subtle emotions and finer sensibilities that images possess in themselves but photography cannot capture. Like a farmer tilling his field, Lu digs into the images that he paints, and in his unique style he reconstructs the “connectivity” between image and emotion. In Nanhu Cinema, Lu painstakingly worked and reworked his rendering of the concrete floor, crafting the green sheen of old fashioned concrete that had been stamped by countless feet. The jade-like hue and texture establish a “connectivity” with our conflicted feelings toward a vanishing way of life. The many blurry and crisp visual details of Night RoadSafety Passageway, including the long scratch marks on the top of the tunnel, the muddy tire tracks, the water-soaked electrical wires and the ghost fire lights of the buildings in the distance have all been worked on by Lu Liang’s art into a powerful “connectivity” with our own apprehension and anxiety. The willow trees of Night RoadWillow are covered in dust — perhaps from a construction site nearby — the pebbles and grains of dirt on the ground are fashioned into a “connectivity” to our fears about the environment. Even the leaves on Lu Liang’s willow trees appear dried up and infected, like a rash that afflicts a corner of the mouth that elicits pain from every movement.

Though the scenes of Lu Liang’s paintings are drawn from neglected corners of everyday life, the inspiration of Brick Pile comes from the shipwreck and icebergs in the seascapes by Casper David Friedrich. In the manner of a poet working classical references into his own poetry, Lu’s works often allude to western classical painting. Intriguingly, Lu Liang sees a mysterious and ineffable cosmic force in the life-like style of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Manet and Goya. Lu Liang integrated the visual experience of classical painting with the context of contemporary painting and formed his own aesthetics of the world. The result is the fashioning of a creative continuity with the classical past in modern China.

Lu’s Dreaming of the Tiger Spring is a courageous conversation with the Chinese classical art: a shining mountain stands in the complex shapes and colors of his oil composition, at once solidly sustentative and illusory, as in a mirage. To endow the mountain rocks with movement and a sense of wetness and solidity, Lu Liang’s palette has the light touch of an ancient fresco, while his strokes evoke the rich thickness of Fan Kuan and Huang Binhong. In Coal Storage, the shape of the coal piles and the brushstrokes on the canvas appears to pay homage to the composition and brushstroke style in the landscapes of Dong Yuan, Mi Fu, Mi Youren and Gao Kegong. The composition of the willows in Night RoadWillow is reminiscent of imagery of The Classics of Poetry: “As I journeyed away, / I saw the drifting of the willow trees”, and the classical landscape paintings from the Song Dynasty. Of course, Lu Liang expresses all this in the composition of western oil painting; in his opaque way, Lu seeks to plant the classical forms deeply and solidly into his oil soil.

Lu’s painting is an ever-more time-consuming process; completing a painting takes anywhere from a couple of months to several years of labor. Some may say that nowhere in the world can one find a place as complicated and absurd as modern China. Lu Liang’s paintings are not profound because they are profound portrayals of reality; rather, they are profound because the artist’s emotive apprehension of reality is profound. When confronted by Lu Liang’s paintings, one can almost hear them giving deep sighs. Lu has created the imagery of the contemporary age in an unprecedented way. They are of the neglected corners of everyday life, imbued with overpowering spiritual apprehension; the silent images that, in its darkness, give rise to insuppressible drives and impulses. Lu’s paintings contain both the spark of life within and a surprising spirit of scrutiny and criticism from without.

Lu Liang is the lyric poet of our times; his paintings are the real landmarks of this age.

Privacy Rights Protection Policy

Privacy Rights Protection Policy

Welcome to the ESLITE GALLERY website. In order to protect your personal information and to allow you to use the various services offered on this website with confidence, The Eslite Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "Eslite") explains the ESLITE GALLERY website's privacy rights protection policy as follows:

 

1. Collecting personal information

When you leave messages or browse the website, Eslite collects your personal information within the scope of collection objectives as outlined in Point 4 (1). When you leave messages, Eslite will ask you to provide such personal information as your name, address, phone number, and email address. After your message has been sent, Eslite will keep your personal information on the server. When you browse our website, the server will automatically record relevant information, including your IP address, how much time you spend on the website, the type of browser you use, and the information you browse and click on. This information is not disclosed to third parties.

 

2. Handling, use, and international transfer of personal information

Once you upload, transfer, input, or provide your personal information and messages to the ESLITE GALLERY website, you are regarded as being aware of and agreeing to Eslite's privacy rights protection policy and your personal information and messages are considered to be within the scope of collection objectives as stipulated in Point 4 (1) to be handled, used, and transferred internationally.

Eslite will not disclose or provide your personal information to or exchange it with third parties except in the following situations:

(1) You agree to share your personal information.

(2) Judicial authorities request your personal information in accordance with the relevant laws and regulations. The ESLITE GALLERY website will cooperate as necessary with said judicial authorities in the carrying out of legal investigations.

(3) You violate ESLITE GALLERY website policies, infringe upon intellectual property rights, or violate other laws.

(4) The personal information you provide is erroneous, false, or incorrect.

(5) When the laws require it.

 

3. Modifications and changes to the privacy rights protection policy

Whenever Eslite makes modifications or changes to the privacy rights protection policy on the ESLITE GALLERY website, it provides notifications to that effect on the website. You may check the website for any such modifications or changes.

 

4. Personal information protection notification and consent

In order to provide ESLITE GALLERY website users the best possible web services and protect personal information or users in accordance with Articles 8 and 9 of the Personal Information Protection Act (hereinafter referred to as “the Personal Information Act"), Eslite, hereby, notifies you of the following information:

(1) Collection objectives, personal information categories; duration, area, object, and methods of utilization.

In order to provide ESLITE GALLERY website users ESLITE GALLERY-related products, services, activities, and latest information and to effectively manage the personal information of users and to carry out and analyze user satisfaction surveys (hereinafter referred to as "collection objectives"), Eslite will collect, handle, use, and/or transfer internationally the personal information you provide to the ESLITE GALLERY website in Taiwan or other areas where the aforementioned collection objectives are required before the aforementioned collection objectives disappear, or other personal information provided subsequently with your consent.

(2) Exercising rights

You may exercise the following rights by calling the ESLITE GALLERY (Service phone: 02-8789-3388, ext. 1588). Except where expressly forbidden by the Personal Information Act, Eslite will not refuse to:

01._check or read your personal information.

02._produce copies of your personal information.

03._add information or make corrections to your personal information.

04._stop collecting, handling, using, and/or transferring internationally your personal information.

05._delete your personal information.

06._accept your request to stop marketing aimed at you.

(3) Points for attention

You agree to use an electronic document to show consent as stipulated under the Personal Information Act. If you do not agree to provide your personal information or you request that information be deleted, or that your personal information no longer be collected, handled, used, and/or transferred internationally, you understand that Eslite will probably no longer be able to provide you message-leaving services, allow you to be qualified to take part in online activities, or provide you with a comprehensive array of web services.

留言失敗

驗證碼輸入有誤

OK